Kloodle Blog

Linking the curriculum to careers

By April 15, 2020 April 21st, 2020 No Comments

We’re working on helping teachers link aspects of their curriculum to careers. This is outlined in the Gatsby Benchmarks and slides in at number 4. Our discussions with customers has highlighted this as a difficult area. Teachers are time poor and there’s a dearth of resources available to help them.  

Our mission at Kloodle is to show young people how the skills and knowledge they are building every day will help them in the future. This can be the resilience built during a tough exam helping them to cope with similar stresses in the future, or an item of knowledge, such as trigonometry, helping them in their future careers. We want to take this a step further and help link the topics they’re learning every day to a potential future use.

The first step in this process is to import aspects of the National Curriculum into Kloodle. The next step is to create a series of resources created by employers that show how a specific topic is used in their job or profession. 

Here’s an example. 

Logging into Kloodle, you’ll see the “Explore” section. 

 

On the left hand side, you’ll see a series of filters. Let’s say we’re a biology teacher. We can click “Biology” under the “Types” filter. 

 

Then, in the filters underneath the title card, we select “Topics”.

 

This will bring up all of the aspects of the Biology National Curriculum loaded into Kloodle. 

Here, we’ll click on the first topic: Cell Biology.

 

You’ll see an activity that has been created called “Careers in Histology”. Clicking into the award, we’ll see a video that discusses NHS careers in histology and how this uses understanding of cell structures to help doctors diagnose disease. 

 

We can then show this video in class, and then add this activity to all our learners’ profiles, creating a record of it for them. 

 

Clicking into a learner’s profile shows the record of the activity, as well as the video. Learners can then look back on this in the future as a reminder of what they did. 

 

 

As a learner, we can also add reflections against this topic: we might upload a blog discussing what we learnt in lesson, or a piece of work showcasing our knowledge of cell structures. We might discuss our thoughts on “histology” as a potential career. 

These reflections can then be seen by teachers as qualitative information on the impact of covering this career in their lesson. 

 

Phill

About Phill

Phillip is co-founder of Kloodle.